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Monday, December 10, 2012

A Lively Table = Lively Guests: HenHouse Linens


While studying architecture during my first year in college one of my good friends, who knew of my love for fashion, gave me a book entitled "Architecture: in Fashion".  Inside this book were numerous historical philosophies and correlations between personal dressing and adornment and the impact that  architecture and interiors have made on the way we dress and live.  In this book and throughout my fashion schooling I've learned how close the dance is between architecture and fashion.  This is mainly due to fashion being a kind of 'sign of the times' through a dictation of dress and adornment and architecture being a more stalwart representation of the structures that encase our personal, social and  occupational livelihoods.  It's this dance that has influenced everything from music to sports to how we entertain socially.

Lately, fashion has been more about the mood.  Completely gone are most of the rules many of us and our parents grew up on.  Only little boys wear shorts with blazers, your shoes must match your handbag, no white after Labor Day and plaids and stripes are not a match.  Today is more about the moods adhering rather than the colors adhering.  Mad mixings of prints and colors that seem irreverent together and visually busy groupings are moving fashion forward past old ideas of how to adorn and decorate and into a realm of being influenced by the collective harmonies associated with a mood, a feeling, a spirit or an energy.  A mashed cohesiveness through shapes, levels of adornment and maybe an understood artistic movement play major roles now more than ever and your interior spaces are not exempt.




Enter Hen House Linens.  You've heard me speak before of how fashion affects the way we dress but I had the pleasure recently of discovering Hen House Linens and seeing how clever pairings of print and color affect the way we entertain.  How often do we sit at a table so seemingly perfect visually that we are scared to even move the silverware out of fear that some disgruntled butler will banish us to the kiddie table.  Well Hen House Linens takes the fussiness off the dining table and throws in a helpful dose of chic fun and festivity.  The company takes one key idea and applies their fun aesthetic to an arrangement of placemats, napkins, napkin rings, table runners, oven mitts and pot holders to name a few.  The idea is that not only are their colors and uniquely scaled prints inspired by familiar remixed graphics fun but also the interchangeability and two-for-one aspect of the aforementioned pieces as well.  

Napkins can become place mats, pot holders can become cozies for dishes on the table and many of the products have two faces.  Bang for your buck and 'two birds with one stone' has always been something that I've deeply been an advocate of.  It adds longevity to fashion and when done well, as with the case of Hen House Linens' extra durable and heat tested materials, the quality wears well season after season and can undergo heavy use and still remain as nice as the first day it was used.  

The added and obvious bonus to Hen House Linens products ushers in when you realize that everything and anything goes together.  It's simple chic that makes sense in everything from a French Countryside home to a modernist dining table.   There are no rules for a perfect table as it can be arranged according to the eclectic tastes of you or your guests, to distinguish drinking glasses and plates amongst your guests and whatever fun mood you wish to create for social gatherings.  I'd like to think that in much of the same way a balanced ensemble in front of the mirror creates feelings of security and confidence, a happy table makes the dinner conversation and interaction among the guests more gratifying and social.  The current delightful collection of Hen House Linens including their chic holiday collection is now available at HenHouseLinens.com and at Gracious Homes to help you arrive exuberantly table ready for the holiday season.


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